Friday, June 05, 2020

Robot Accident Investigation

Yesterday I gave an talk at the ICRA 2020 workshop Against Robot Dystopias. The workshop should have been in Paris but - like most academic meetings during the lockdown - was held online. In the zoom chat window toward the end of the workshop many of us were wistfully imagining continued discussions in a Parisian bar over a few glasses of wine. Next year I hope. The workshop was excellent and all of the talks should be online soon.

My talk was an extended version of last year's talk for AI@Oxford What could possibly go wrong. With results from our new paper Robot Accident Investigation, the talk outlines a fictional investigation of a fictional robot accident. We had hoped to stage the mock accident, in the lab, with human volunteers and report a real investigation (of a mock accident) but the lockdown put paid to that too. So we have had to use our imagination and construct - I hope plausibly - the process and findings of the accident investigation.

Here is the abstract of our paper.
Robot accidents are inevitable. Although rare, they have been happening since assembly-line robots were first introduced in the 1960s. But a new generation of social robots are now becoming commonplace. Often with sophisticated embedded artificial intelligence (AI) social robots might be deployed as care robots to assist elderly or disabled people to live independently. Smart robot toys offer a compelling interactive play experience for children and increasingly capable autonomous vehicles (AVs) the promise of hands-free personal transport and fully autonomous taxis. Unlike industrial robots which are deployed in safety cages, social robots are designed to operate in human environments and interact closely with humans; the likelihood of robot accidents is therefore much greater for social robots than industrial robots. This paper sets out a draft framework for social robot accident investigation; a framework which proposes both the technology and processes that would allow social robot accidents to be investigated with no less rigour than we expect of air or rail accident investigations. The paper also places accident investigation within the practice of responsible robotics, and makes the case that social robotics without accident investigation would be no less irresponsible than aviation without air accident investigation.
And the slides from yesterday's talk:




Special thanks to project colleagues and co-authors: Prof Marina Jirotka, Prof Carl Macrae, Dr Helena Webb, Dr Ulrik Lyngs and Katie Winkle.

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